Fried rice recipe 

Fried rice Let’s say that when you are staying at home looking for a new job, you won’t be the happiest person in the world, and in these cases you need your own comfort food and one of my comfort food items is fried rice. It is true I am not originally from Far East Asia but Asian and Indian food comprises the largest percentage of my comfort food.

Anyway fried rice is a very easy dish to make, and lots of people love it as you can use all your leftovers. Leftover rice, meat or chicken, adding to it leftover steamed vegetables or fresh; both would be perfect.  There are so many ways to cook it as every region and area has its own way and touch. But here I share my most favourite one.

Ingredients (4-5 servings):

  • 20 g                      Vegetable oil
  • 350 g  (2 cups)     Cooked white rice ( steamed, boiled) any would be good
  • 2 pcs                    Meduim size carrot cut into julienne
  • 1PC                      Zucchini cut into julienne
  • 1PC                      Onion chopped
  • 2 cloves               Garlic roughly chopped
  • 30 grams             Premium dark soya sauce                                                   
  • 20 grams             Oyster sauce
  • 10 grams             Chinese spicy sauce
  • 15 grams            Sesame oil
  •  1-2                     Spring onions (scallions) roughly chopped

Method : 

In a wok heat the vegetable oil, add in the onion and sauté for 3 minutes. Add in the garlic and sauté for another 2 minutes. Add in the carrots and zucchini and sauté for couple of minutes till preferred tenderness is reached, I prefer my vegetables crunchy so I only sauté for 2 minutes. 

Add to the wok your cooked and cold rice and stir for a minute. 

While sautéing add in your sauces. Keep tasting while cooking, the quantity of the sauces could be adjusted up to taste. When it is done drizzle the sesame oil over and garnish with the green onions.

regards,

KJ

 

Hong Kong local and street food !

Well, living in Hong Kong was definitely a life time experience for me. Many things changed while staying there, what I eat, the way I eat and definitely the amount of food I take.

Before moving to HK , and naively whenever Chinese food was mentioned all what used to come up to my mind was sweet and sour chicken or sesame chicken or something close to that. Needless to say that by moving there I found out that most of what we consider as chinese food is actually not the real thing but an adapted version. And the adaptation differs from one place to another. As for example in europe it has a little western touch and in the states it is adapted to satisfy the local customers in there.

Egg puffs
Egg puffs

I won’t be able to write everything about Hong kong food, as I myself couldn’t try everything in 6 months. But I will certainly  mention my most favourite food items. Either eaten in food markets or in the street.

For the street food my favourites are:

  1.  Eggs puff ( gai dan zai),  HK style waffles, double-sided grilled that is soft and chewy, that should be eaten only hot and fresh.
  2.  Fish balls, curry (ga lei yu daan),  made of corn starch and low quality fish. This mixture is shaped into balls to be deep fried and then served curry sauce.
  3.  Iced milk tea, it is nothing more than a strong tea, and the way it served it hot tea with ice and some ( or plenty) condensed milk. My favourit tea base was earl grey.
  4. Egg tarts, which is basically a puff pastry dough that is filled with egg mixture, made of eggs cream and cinnamon.
  5. Moon cake, is considered as one of the most traditional Hong Kong desserts as apparently there is a really deep ancient story behind these cakes that are exclusively made to celebrate for mid-autumn festival. Traditional Moon cakes have two stuffings, either red bean paste or lotus paste, whith salted egg yolk or two in the center.
  6. Egg Custard buns (Lai wong bao), which are steamed buns that is stuffed with custard, there is also another version that is stuffed with red bean paste which is as popular as the custard one.
Moon cake with two egg yolks
Moon cake with two egg yolks

Apart from street food, and on special occasions, I used to go to have a “family dinner” with the whole restaurant crew in one of the traditional food markets. Where you actually get to eat everything you could think of: from fried rice to duck intestine, and maybe some stir fried frog legs.

We almost ordered the same thing every time we went out. Century  egg( thousand-year old egg) was a must, which is basically pickled eggs  (just for couple of weeks) that is served with pickled ginger!! And this is considered as a delicacy. Hong Kong style fried rice, which had eggs, chicken or ham and definitely some scallions. Razor clams, (those are  my favourite) but not my chef’s as he had to pay as these were quite expensive. These clams are cooked with some bell peppers and dark thick soya sauce. Fried soba noodles where also something important on that round table. Deep fried tofu and deep-fried squid.

If you think that eating on a round table is a nice thing, you actually need to rethink as that is not so true at least not always. It is true that on round tables you can reach everything by just turning the glass center which rotates and makes it easy for everyone to reach, but the problem is  if the person in front of you was a chopsticks expert, and was eating in a speed that you have never seen before. If that person was there, that means he is going to eat so fast and he wants some from everything on that table. So while you trying to take some of the food and struggling with those chopsticks, he would be rotating that table non stop. Now the only way for you to eat that night is either to use your hand to stop the table from rotating, which is considered rude or simply attack the food and try to grab it before you find the center of the table moving again.

 

For more Information about HK street food follow this link for an article in HK magazine:

http://hk-magazine.com/restaurants/article/z-hong-kong-street-food

Cheers from an orange ,

KJ

 

 

 

 

 

Travelling to Hong Kong !!

CasewaybayI would say that I was quite lucky to be able to live in Hong Kong for 6 months in order to do my internship at one of the best fine dining restaurants there. In this thread I will write about the basic things you should know if you are just planning a visit, moving there, or you are already there and you need some guidance.

Hong Kong SAR

Hong Kong Special Administrative Region of the people’s Republic of China.

Although HK is considered a city in China, it has a different currency (HK dollar), different language (Cantonese as opposed to the Mandarin they speak in China), and you are required to issue a different visa. This means that if you have a nationality that requires you to get a visa for HK and China before you depart your country then granting a visa for China doesn’t mean you are allowed to enter HK and vice versa.

In general Hong Kong is divided into 3 general parts: HK Island, Kowloon, and New Territories. HK Island is considered the Westernized area where most of the expats and almost all the rich people live. And as soon as you travel to the Kowloon side you will actually feel the difference and see more of the traditional chinese neighbourhoods.

As soon as you arrive at HK International Airport you can either take the MTR (underground) or simply take a cab. You might save a little bit of money by using the MTR, but if you have heavy luggage or if you just had to fly for 11 hours to get over here then don’t worry about saving 100 HK$ which is around 10 euros and just get in the Cab. Be careful though, because here in Honk Kong there are three different colors for Taxicabs. Red operates almost around all HK, Green is for New territories and blue is only for Lantau Island.  Most of the taxi drivers understand basic english or at least they know the names of the places in English. Also be careful about putting any luggage other than a purse or back-pack with you in the cabin, anything else you better put back in the trunk or the driver will charge you extra.

Finding a place to eat should not be a problem, even if you are not ready to try any chinese food yet, you will find McDonald’s almost everywhere in HK. I will also write a later blog about food in Hong Kong and about some street food that you have to try while you are there.

After you arrive at your destination, and in order to travel around the city, you either keep taking taxicabs (which could break your bank), or you get your Octopus card which allows you to take the MTR, trams, and busses. The plus side to this card is you can even use it to pay in most supermarkets. You can recharge the Octopus card at any supermarket, or MTR station.

Sightseeing. There are so many places you can visit in Hong Kong. From small temples to large ones, islands and much more. You can know about almost everything in the official discover HK website, where I will also write later about specific places that are a must to see.

The very last but not least thing that people want to know about is Nightlife. In Hong Kong there are mainly two places to enjoy the wild nightlife. LKF (Lan Kwai fung) in Central and Wan Chai, both of which are located on HK island. For sure there are other places but those are the main two. If you are looking to meet young crowds, locals and foreigners then LKF is your choice. There you will find countless clubs, bars and restaurants all in the same area. You will also find more people outside, rather than inside, on the street drinking and enjoying their time. However, if you fancy a more mature crowd, an escort, or a girl to take home then Wan Chai is the place to go.

There are so many websites for expats and for meeting people, two favorites of mine were:

Cheers from An Orange,

K